Mumbai Buildings To Get Taller As Govt Unveils New TDR Policy


New TDR policy links the width of the road to construction permitted along the roads. This basically means, the wider the road, the taller will be the buildings. Image credit- istockphoto.comĀ 
Highlights
  1. The new TDR policy links construction along roads to the width of the road, allowing for taller buildings.
  2. Roads with widths ranging from 12 to 30 meter will now be eligible for an additional FSI of 2.5.
  3. Urban planners are worried that this will increase the pressure on Mumbai's creaky infrastructure.

MUMBAI: The Maharashtra government recently rolled out its new Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) policy for Mumbai.  The new policy links the width of the road to construction permitted along the roads. This basically means, the wider the road, the taller will be the buildings.  

“It is according to the principle which states the wider the road, the more Floor Space Index (FSI) that is permissible, so based on that we have made this policy. It is already applicable to the rest of the state and we have now notified it in the Mumbai region,” said state urban development secretary, Nitin Kareer.

According to the outlines of the new policy, areas containing roads with widths ranging from 12 to 30 meter will now be eligible for an additional FSI of 2.5, up from the earlier limit of 2. This is set to benefit development projects coming up on in areas like LBS Marg, SV Road and JVLR among others.

However, the new TDR policy is not applicable to the roads which are less than 9 meters wide. And while the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) will soon beginning widening roads, this essentially means that redevelopment projects in suburbs like Dahisar, Kandivali and Goregaon, where the roads are narrow, will lose out on this extra FSI. Developers are asking the government to rectify this.

“Those roads in the suburbs which are not 9 meters wide should be deemed to be 9 meters wide so that ongoing projects are not affected,” says Nayan Shah, CEO & MD of Mayfair Housing.

However, urban experts are worried about the impact this will have on the city’s creaking infrastructure.

“In the absence of modern planning, this policy seems extremely irrational. Do we have the infrastructure to link the width of the road to the construction? And when the BMC’s development plan is still in the pipeline, what was the hurry for the government to notify this policy?” asks Prasad Shetty, a noted urban planner.

While that may be the case, there is no denying that Mumbai needs space to grow and the new TDR policy could allow for taller buildings, increase housing stock in the city and possibly reduce prices, with more apartments being built and released into the market. However, the government must also ensure that infrastructure concerns are taken care of, in the process.

Edited By Nikhil Narayan Sivadas

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